Pillole: L’uso della virgola

italyamonews

La virgola è il segno di interpunzione più usato. Viene utilizzato per rappresentare una pausa breve tra le parole e, molte volte, svolge un ruolo determinante per una corretta trasmissione e percezione del messaggio. In particolare la virgola si usa per:

separare i termini di un  elenco

Es: Paesi accomunati dalla produzione di uno specifico alimento o da un determinato tema: Bio-Mediterraneo, Cereali e Tuberi, Isole, Zone Aride, Frutta e Legumi, Spezie, Caffè, Cacao e Riso

dividere frasi connesse tra di loro senza l’uso di congiunzioni

Es: Non a caso il concept di fondo del padiglione Italia è quello del vivaio, dell’incubatore di idee da far crescere e diffondere.

dividere una preposizione subordinata dalla principale

Es: Il sito che ospita Expo 2015 non è soltanto un contenitore, ma è vera e propria incarnazione dei valori e dei principi del tema di questa 150esima esposizione universale: “Nutrire il pianeta. Energia per…

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Learning to Cook with Italian Chefs

venturewithlinda

Sometimes I wonder if Italy was ever named after it’s delicious cuisines. I mean, they all sound the same –“EAT ALL DAY” or EAT-(ILY). Food is the one thing I looked forward to the most when I came to Italy. It’s home to all the heavenly carbs  we have a love/hate relationship with — Pizza, pasta, gnocchi, lasagna, and all that goodies!

I was never the one to buy pastas at a restaurant back in the States, because I thought I perfected my homemade pasta from a box. It was the easiest and quickest Italian dish I knew how to make, because i lived off of them all throughout college. But little did I know… I have been cooking them WRONG this whole time!

Thanks to my study center at ACCENT in Rome, I got the opportunity to cook with Italian chefs and learn about the typical ingredients and techniques used to make…

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HD glasses could take visitors in Rome back to days of Caesar

Madeinitalymall's Blog

Article published by l’Italo Americano on April 15th, 2015 by l’Italo Americano staff : http://www.italoamericano.org/story/2015-4-14/Rome

Roman Forums may be explored through the high definition technology – Photo credits Sergio Lanna

According to ANSA, Rome’s local government is working on a project to introduce 3D “augmented reality” glasses for the Imperial Forum, giving visitors the possibility of experiencing the ancient Roman ruins from the days of Caesar, Trajan and Nerva.

Rome is planning to experiment the ‘immersive’, high definition, virtual reality glasses designed by two young Roman engineers. The first applications for the glasses have been at rock concerts in Rome. As Mayor Marino said, this is going to be a surprise for April 21 when Rome will celebrate its birthday.

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(ROME)ing in Gelatos

venturewithlinda

When in Rome, there is absolutely nothing better than having a double scoop of Stracciatella gelato dipped in chocolate while walking through the ancient city! I kid you not, gelato on every street corner with flavors that you cannot get anywhere else in the world. To keep up with my self-titled ice cream connoisseur back in California, I need to uphold my  title in Rome, and continue the search for the best ice cream (gelato) out there! (Or at least in Rome). Here are a list of my ongoing life-long search, or to be more accurate, excuse to eat ice cream everyday!

1. FRIGIDARIUM

Store FrontSelectionsFrigadarium and strachitella with cream

Flavors I tried: Frigidarium, stracciatella, tiramisu, pistachio

Where: Via del Governo Vecchio, 112, 00186 Roma

2. DON NINO

Flavors I tried: Hazelnut and Pistachio

Where: Via del Pastini, 134, 00186 Roma (by the Pantheon)

3.  GELATERIA ARTIGIANALE CORONA

IMG_4982IMG_4976IMG_4977IMG_4980

Flavors I tried: Cioccolato Bianco allo Violette (White Chocolate with Violet) and…

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Boh, beh, mah

Back in Italy

No, the title of this post hasn’t become mangled in transmission. 🙂 There are a few of these almost-a-word expressions in Italian that are used quite frequently in informal settings. This is the kind of thing that isn’t (normally!) taught in language class and can only really be picked up properly when talking with Italians.

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5 Rules You Should Always Break When Traveling in Italy

Seeing and Savoring Italy

5. Never Drive in Italy

Contrary to popular opinion, driving in Italy is not an extreme sport. Italy has an excellent network of motorways and if you are comfortable driving in the States, exercise common sense and be aware of your limitations based on language skills and itinerary you should be fine. Like all road trips you need to be flexible and have a sense of adventure. Expect to get lost even with a good GPS (mandatory). If you want to get off the tourist flow, travel like an Italian and see the country from the ground up, consider driving. Just remember do not park in a space marked Divieto di Sosta (No Parking) and follow a few helpful tips that I have learned driving in Italy.     ciao

4. Don’t Bother Visiting Milan

At first glance Milan can be a little intimidating. It doesn’t have the historical familiarity of…

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