Learn Italian words: i segnali stradali

I bet many of you are coping with Italian traffic, and I am well aware that driving in Italy can sometimes be a nightmare because Italians… well, let’s just say that we have a very loose concept of “traffic laws”. This is exactly why you don’t need any further distraction or brain teaser while driving in Italy: for that purpose we have just prepared for you an Italian language lesson about all the Italian words you need to get an Italian driving licence and a brand new infographic about road signs in Italy!

Learn Italian words: i segnali stradali

Originally published on www.kappalanguagueschool.com.

Advertisements

Alcuni consigli per imparare la lingua italiana e altre lingue!

Qualche ottimo consiglio per chi vuole imparare l’italiano (o qualsiasi altra lingua) dai nostri amici di “Affresco Italiano”!

Affresco della Lingua Italiana

Ciao a tutti!

Il nostro post di oggi ha una tipologia molto diversa, poiché non parlerò di grammatica, letteratura, arte, etimologia, ecc. Oggi vi darò alcuni consigli utili per aiutarvi a studiare qualsiasi lingua straniera, in base, naturalmente, alla mia esperienza prima con l’inglese, poi con l’italiano e adesso con il tedesco.

Non è facile imparare una lingua straniera, vero? Soprattutto quando si è ormai adulti e si ha poco tempo da dedicare agli studi. Se si studia una lingua straniera all’università, si è di fronte a un programma molto preciso, a un vero è proprio percorso linguistico (grammatica, cultura, letteratura, civiltà, ecc.) che porterà gli studenti a un buon livello di conoscenza della lingua straniera. Sì, ho detto un “buon livello” e non un “ottimo livello”. Interiorizzare una nuova lingua, in tutti i suoi aspetti, non è una cosa che succede da un giorno all’altro, e tanto meno alla…

View original post 708 more words

Learn Italian words: la pasta!

Know your pasta: easier said than done! Italians are so obsessed with their pasta that they actually created a chart to classify every type according to its structure, it’s lenght or its texture: it’s basically a pasta periodic table! That said, it is not surprising that many Italian language students have an hard time to recognize and name even the most common varieties of pasta, due to the fact that Italian words for pasta, although often containing open references to its appearence, usually originate from a dialect word. Moreover, some kinds of pasta have a different name for almost every region, to the point that you might be misunderstood if you ask for stortoni in Rome or maccheroni in Milan.

You might think that internet can help, but this is not always the case. Just take a look at this infographic, available in any major stock photo website.

bad infographic about Italian pasta Mistakes and misspellings in this artwork are so numerous and so hilarious that one could actually think they were made on purpose. Let’s analyze them in details and try to learn some Italian from them:

Nidi di rondie: besides the fact that nidi di rondine are actually a particular way to cook tagliatelle, the author of this infographic just forgot an n.
Lasagnia: In Italian language, the palatal sound (/ɲ/) is never followed by a diacritic i. Thank you, and have some lasagna. 🙂
Funghetto:
pasta names are always plural. And that should be pretty obvious, since in every box you can find many pieces of the same variety of pasta. Just to try to search on Google “funghetto pasta” and “funghetti pasta“: can you spot the difference?
Gobetti rigatti:
the author of this image had so many problems with double consonants! Which is normal and understandable, considering that double consonants in Italian language have an importance which has no equivalent in any other European language. That said, the correct form is gobbetti (from gobba, hunchback) rigati (striped).
Konkilioni:
in the Italian orthography, the stop velar sound /k/ is represented by the letter c, possibly paired with an h when followed by a palatal vowel (e or i). Moreover, this word poses another difficulty for foreign students, since the lateral sound /ʎ/ (similar to the one you find in Spanish caballo) is very specific to Italian language and  is always written using the diacritic sequence gli (as in aglio, figlio, moglie, gli). Therefore, the correct form is conchiglioni.
Kanellone:
again, /k/ sound, double consonants and plural instead of singular. Correct form is cannelloni.
Cornetti rigatti: cornetti
(from corni, horns) rigati.
Elighe:
almost correct, except for the confusion between voiced and unvoiced stop velars, /k/ and /g/. In this case, the sound is unvoiced: eliche (literally fans).

Now, we really want to set the record straight. That is why we prepared a new infographic with our favourite types of pasta in the hope this will help you through the labyrinth of the pasta periodic chart!

Infographic about Italian pasta

Read the original article on www.kappalanguageschool.com!

infographic to learn italian words

Learn Italian words: cosa c’è sulla scrivania?

You got it right, the question is: “what’s on your desk?”. Now, the answer might be easier than you think, since many Italian words describing IT and technology in general are English words (computer, scanner) or integrated loan words (just think about the verb scannerizzare, with its variant scannare, to scan).
That said, some of the things you might find on your desk require an Italian word to be named, so we are confident you will find this new infographic useful to learn new Italian words!

Infographic to learn Italian words

Originally posted on www.kappalanguageschool.com.

#SingIt: 10 songs about Rome (and Romans) you’ve probably never heard of

If you’re searching for the right soundtrack for your holiday in Rome or just looking for some themed-song to learn Italian language and culture faster but you’ve definitely had enough with wonder hits like Arrivederci Roma or with Louis Prima babbling some broken Italian words over the swing of a big band, we have something for you! Here’s a list of International and Italian songs that, each one in its own peculiar way, catch the spirit of the Eternal City and will be able to guide you through its discovery.

International songs about Rome

To get you into the mood, let’s start with international songs. Many artists and bands have indeed composed songs about Rome or taken Rome as a symbol, sometimes of decadence, other times of magnificence; at times of corruption and, certainly, of beauty.

Jerry Garcia – When I paint my masterpiece

The lysergic king Jerry Garcia, leader of the Grateful Dead and prominent carachter of the late 60s-ealy 70s counter-culture, have been using to cover this wonderful Bob Dylan composition from at least 1972. The song’s topic is not specifically focused on Rome rather than on an artist’s quest for inspiration, but even if sometimes the description of the city fails to escape usual stereotypes, the first three lines are one of the most powerful and accurate depiction of Rome’s decadence:

Oh, the streets of Rome are filled with rubble
Ancient footprints are everywhere
You can almost think that you’re seein’ double
On a cold, dark night on the Spanish Stairs

Peggy Lee – Autumn in Rome

This one is definitely a classic, but it differs from other famous hits of the 50s focused on Rome for its delicate, jazzy musical approach and for its songwriting which brings to life nostalgic pictures of golden skies and gentle Mediterranean breezes in opposition to the cold and grey advance of winter in a northern city.

Tom Waits – In the Colosseum

No one better than Tom Waits could have represented the horrible and beautiful display of humanity that used to liven up a night at the Colosseum. Of course, in this case the Anfiteatro Flavio is a mere symbol that Waits uses to revive a theme which he holds very dear: the pointless, chaotic entropy of life.

This Heat – SPQR

Rather than considering the Roman Empire for its magnificence or its cultural influence, post-punk british band This Heat turns it into a dark omen of a dystopian, totalitarian society (for the ones who don’t know it, the acronym S.P.Q.R. stands for Senatus Populusque Romanus). Band leader Charles Hayward describes the lyrics as “a cultural view of history and logic and expedience and how we are inside that, too.”

Phoenix – Rome

With their unique mixture of Easy Listening and Electronic, the french band Phoenix were able to give birth to this danceable hit while still catching one of the party-unfriendly features of Rome: its decadence, opposed to its status of Eternal City.

“While the Coliseum stands, Rome shall stand; when the Coliseum falls, Rome shall fall; when Rome falls, the world shall fall.” [Venerable Bede (c. 673-735) quoting a prophecy of Anglo-Saxon pilgrims]

Italian songs about Rome

Letting alone folk ballads and traditional songs, Italian hits genuinely focused Rome are less than you might think. At least this can be said for the very few songs that are worthy to be remembered and manage to distance themselves from the usual depiction of the city – although Italian stereotypes about Rome differ significantly from foreign ones. Here’s a selection of five Italian songs about Rome that you can also use to learn some Italian.

Colle Der Fomento – Il cielo su Roma

Let’s start our journey with a song that we have already played in the last episode of Aperitalia, our webradio dedicated to Italian language students, for the roman Hip-Hop band Colle Der Formento. The sky above Rome quoted in the title is a big starry entity that observes the dramatic moltitude of lives and experiences that makes Rome a modern Babylon. The song lyrics are focused on the life in the suburbs and in the most popular neighborhoods of the city, mixing a genuine street attitude with an emphatic and somehow nostalgic songwriting.

È nella testa
Tutto qua tutto qua
Comunque resta
Tutto qua tutto qua
È nella testa
Tutto qua
Restano le mejo stelle solo le mejo che dà

Virginiana Miller – L’eternità di Roma

Again, a band which emphasizes the status of “Eternal City”, where eternity stands also for eternal decadence: post rock sextet Virginiana Miller builds up a delicate but yet merciless depiction of this crucible of vices and virtues which is Rome.

Vittime e carnefici
Demoni e pontefici
Polvere su polvere
Di polvere di secoli

Gabriella Ferri – Chitarra Romana

We promised we would have left out traditional and folk songs, but we have to make an exception for the queen of Italian modern folk, Gabriella Ferri. Many of her songs could have been included in this list as she has undoubtedly brought forward the true spirit of Rome. May this beautiful Chitarra romana serve as an example of her outstanding talent.

Claudio Baglioni – Porta Portese

If you don’t know what Porta Portese is, you might want to revisit your schedule for your next Roman holiday to visit this characteristic open air market which is one of the few traditional flea markets that resisted the assault of big shopping mall and standardized shopping. Roman songwriter Claudio Baglioni has dedicated a lovely ballad to this tradition which every Sunday brings back in time a whole area of the city.

Corrado Guzzanti – Grande Raccordo Anulare

Speaking of tradition, we couldn’t leave out the one place which all Romans have in common: the Grande Raccordo Anulare (GRA), the huge circular highway that embraces the whole city and is doomed by an eternal flow of traffic. Comedian Corrado Guzzanti, imitating the famous songwriter Antonello Venditti, offers a picturesque and funny depiction of this sort of urban limbo. Enjoy! 😀

Originally posted on www.kappalanguageschool.com!

Welcome to Kappa Language School!

La nostra filosofia in un video che descrive perfettamente chi siamo! #learnItalian

Kappa Language School Blog

Alright, we did it!

We finally decided to enrich our website with a full-functioning blog! This is the first post so don’t expect anything special, just our students giving you the warmest welcome you can get!

View original post

Alcune poesie d’autunno

Chissà che i nostri studenti non sappiano segnalarcene altre (nella loro lingua)!

Affresco della Lingua Italiana

poesie d'autunnoCiao, ragazzi!

L’autunno è appena arrivato in Europa. Ormai le foglie cominciano a cadere e tutto intorno si tinge di rosso, giallo e arancio. Ho scelto alcune poesie che parlano di questa bellissima stagione, spero che vi piacciano. Se ne conoscete altre, condividetele nei commenti.
Quale stagione dell’anno vi piace di più e perché?
Un caro saluto!
Claudia Lopes

Autunno
(Vincenzo Cardarelli)

Autunno. Già lo sentimmo venire
nel vento d’agosto,
nelle pioggie di settembre
torrenziali e piangenti
e un brivido percorse la terra
che ora, nuda e triste,
accoglie un sole smarrito.
Ora passa e declina,
in quest’autunno che incede
con lentezza indicibile,
il miglior tempo della nostra vita
e lungamente ci dice addio.

In questa notte d’autunno
(Nazim Hikmet – poeta polacco)

In questa notte d’autunno
sono pieno delle tue parole
parole eterne come il tempo
come la materia
parole pesanti come la mano
scintillanti come le stelle.

Dalla…

View original post 188 more words