What happens when you type “Italian” in the YouTube search box

Trying to learn something about a specific culture via YouTube can be tricky and dangerous: one might end up in a Dedalus of stereotypes and misconceptions that will lead to a faulty understanding of such a complex and beautiful expression of humanity. When it comes to Italy and Italians you actually know what’s coming: thousands of videos about recipes and hand gestures and some very bad joke about how Italians do things.

As usual, we’re here to help: this is why our team of social media engineers has performed a deep research on your behalf, trying to spot the most interesting/genuine/disturbing videos about Italians and Italy on YouTube.

Let’s start with a milestone: Peter Griffin turning into an Italian. He actually already did it in the past, and with poor but yet hilarious results. This time McFarlane & friends seem to try setting the record straight, at least linguistically: the Italian-spoken part sounds very genuine, although the whole concept of the video is based on the usual stereotypes concerning more Italian-Americans than Italian-Italians.

Italian Food

In the past 12 months, Buzzfeed has almost literally bombed the audience with videos of people reacting to things or people asking other people silly questions. There is though one video that we can define accurate, and it shows a bunch of young Italians trying US “snacks”. Now, we know we are kinda bitchy about our food, and that might be a flaw sometimes but… how can you call those things? I mean, seriously: pink chips?

On the same page, here’s a very entertaining video showing Italian nonne tasting the (in)famous Olive Garden menu. Just two observations: there are, obviously, two intruders in the video and, dear grandma, merda means literally “shit”, but we know you’re too polite to say that.

Want some real Italian food? Fear not, the YouTube is packed with recipes, some of which are actually genuine.

Italian Music

For the person who’s writing, this subject is kinda sensitive, and I must admit that YouTube results for “Italian music” didn’t fail to confirm my prejudice: the idea that the whole world has of music coming from Italy is stereotyped, outdated and somehow offensive. This, needless to say, is also (or mainly) our fault, as we like to export bright examples of musical putrescence turning them into semi-global events.
Anyway, let’s take a look to these top YouTube results regarding Italian songs and music: just don’t hope for the best.

Music for an Italian Dinner: seriously? Some songs in this cheesy bunch of trite hits are not even Italian. Swing and crooning are definitely NOT part of Italian musical culture.

Best Italian Songs of the decade: “best” according to who? I understand some of these are quite big names in the Italian scene, but honestly Italian rock has much more to offer other than this depressing list copy-paste songs.

Fergie – Be Italian (from “Nine”): I would have gladly ignored this video if it wasn’t for the stereotype of Italian kids confronting prosperous sexuality ad a very young age. Welcome to Italy, where everything is like in a Dolce&Gabbana commercial!

Italian YouTubers

It turned out that Italy has actually produced some pretty famous YouTube stars and influencers. I honestly did vaguely know two of them, and as an Italian I have mixed feelings about how they export, let’s say, Italian lifestyle.

Let’s start with Marzia, showing up with this video in the first page of my YouTube search. She’s the girlfriend of one of the most famous Youtubers in the world, Pewdiepie, and probably one the most famous italian Youtubers too. She seems like a very pretty girl and a pleasant person. I mean, I wouldn’t dislike the world to think that “Italians” are this way. Btw the video is kinda fun at the beginning and then becomes boringly dumb.

Greta Menchi popped out of the YouTube world because of a controversy: she has been nominated as a member of the jury at the last Sanremo Festival, arousing the indignation of some web bullies who thought she was not skilled enough for the job (as if one needed to be skilled to take part to Sanremo…).

The great Gianluca Vacchi is an Italian mystery: self-proclaimed viveur, he is actually CEO of a big firm and apparently spends his life on a boat wearing a pareo and dancing like a tourist resort entertainer. I kinda like the guy, although his videos carry an idea of “Italianity” that doesn’t exist in real life.

Italian Language

And here we are in my area of expertise! Fear not, I won’t bore you with Italian language tips or grammar. As a proof of my good intentions, here’s a small introduction:

Simply the best scene EVER about foreigners coping with Italian language.

And here it comes the weird stuff: picking up speaking Italian. Apart from the fact that the guy doesn’t even speak Italian properly, this technique seems to work fine, although sometimes he seems to slip into sexual harassment.

20 Italian words you are saying wrong: about time, finally our American and British friends will understand how to pronounce grazie correctly! 😀

I wouldn’t even dare to comment this: it’s Monty Python, therefore it’s amazing by definition.

Italian Hand Gestures

Interesting topic, isn’t it? Although non-verbal communication is a part of every language, Italians seem to rely on that massively: this is why an Italian language students will definitely need some guidance! YouTube is actually packed with videos illustrating Italian gestures, so help yourselves. And yes, the first video is from Dolce&Gabbana, and it’s superb.

Want some more? Check out our infographic about Italian gestures!

Italian Culture

Sailing the sea of misconceptions about Italian culture I encountered two videos which seem to be encouragingly accurate, the first from an Italian Youtuber, the second from Tia, an half-Jamaican, half-Nigerian, American born girl with a lovely accent and a very fun attitude.

WTF area

Yes, there are strange videos too. Like this first one, that shows Italian cops (presumably) trying out a bulletproof vest.

This is weird and I don’t even know why it has so many views, especially considering that in Italy we tend not be that much into guns.

If you follow us, you already know the guy: Italian Spiderman, not really Italian and yet simply MAJESTIC.

Indeed, Kobe Bryant is amazingly fluent in Italian. Didn’t you know that? He was born and partially raised in the Belpaese while his father, Joe Bryant, was playing for Italian teams.

 

And with this last firework ends our short playlist of YouTube videos about Italians and Italian Culture. If you liked it, please share and comment with your own suggestions!

Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.

 

What I learned in Italy

To honor to my sixth month here in Rome (which sadly will be also my last) I would like to share with you today some VERY informal thoughts on what I learned in Italy. I will take you back to 11 August 2016, the day I arrived here in the beautiful Rome. The sun was shining and it was a summer day like all others in Italy so the streets of Rome were full of Romans (surprise! They don’t go on vacation that much: Rome is a really busy town), which brings us to the first thing you should learn in Italy:

  • it’s REALLY important to learn the language and make an effort to practice it on the streets and in stores with locals. Not everyone is able to speak English and, as you will figure out, a lot of things are only available in Italian, although, especially in the city center, you will find amusing examples of broken English. For that purpose, certain internet pages packed with Italian Language lessons and exercises are a blessing. Or you can always do it the old fashioned way and learn Italian by joining an Italian Language Course (as I did, and my Italian is so good that I am still writing articles in English! :P).

Being installed in my new home for this six months, I had to go out for grocery shopping, which I know is not the most fashionable shopping you can do but it has to be done. Anyway, this brings us to the second thing I learned:

  • when in Italy, you should get to know your local Italian cuisine – because no, there isn’t just ONE Italian cuisine. Not all of the food that you are familiar with in your home country will be available in the supermarkets, that’s why it is important to learn how to cook with the food that is available in Italy. The Italian cuisine is more than only pasta or pizza: make the best out of it and join an Italian Cooking Class where you will also be able to practice Italian and make new friends which share with you the disgrace of being totally incompetent in preparing a decent Italian dish.

Last but not last there is the thing that I enjoyed the most here:

  • learn how to appreciate Italian culture. It’s maybe quite different from yours and it the difference can be disorienting at first but, believe me, these people really know how to live. The culture of having an aperitivo after work with your friends, enjoying a good meal for (at least) a couple of hours, having a walk through the city center or just spending your afternoon while doing nothing and drinking espresso should be included in the world heritage list. The Italian culture is about the importance of family and friends in your life and that’s what will make your new Italian friends the unforgettable ones. Or, at least, this is what happened to me!

 

Arrivederci Roma, alla prossima avventura! xoxoxo

Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.

Infografica: parole in cucina!

We all know italian cuisine is a world recognized excellence… but to efficiently cook italian dishes you also need the proper italian words!

Here’s a quick help from our team: an infographic containing most of the italian vocabulary you can find in your kitchen. Enjoy and share!

cucina
Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.

Italy, Italians and Italian Culture through popular memes

Someone says that, in this puzzling era where reality is augmented, people share posts rather than experience and everything travels on top of an optical cable, memes will be the foundation of the upcoming digital culture.

At least we have discovered fire.

At least we have discovered fire.

Although Italy (or at least part of it) seems to be somehow refractory to widespread technological innovation (see picture), memes about italianity are actually quite common on the internet. Pages like Original Italian Memes are indeed offering collections of Italy-related memes, and a simple Google search can open the doors to a universe of (sometimes idiotic) interpretations of Italian Language and Culture.

Italian Food

Being products of popular culture, memes often aim to mock renowned peculiarities of a specific culture. And I can bet everything I own that the first thing that comes to your mind when thinking of Italy and Italians is food. Although some food originally considered italian has somehow turned into world heritage (Pizza and Nutella, anyone?), there is still roomfor originality, as in the Latte Art, an elegant extension of the Cappuccino culture, category or in those memes who parody the irreducible affection that italian families have for anything related to food and eating.

Gorgeous, but NEVER after midday!

Gorgeous, but NEVER after midday!

As my grandma used to say: "t'è abbastato?" ("did you have enough?")

As my grandma used to say: “t’è abbastato?” (“did you have enough?”). Regardless of the answer, I would get more food.

Probably not food at all, if you ask me...

Probably not food at all, if you ask me…

True, there's also pasta.

True, there’s also pasta.

Italian Family

Another thing peculiar with Italy is, of course, family structure. In particular, nonni and nonne are priviledged subjects of very funny and sweet memes, preferably realized in the US or in Australia, where the descendent of Italian immigrants are still holding on to some of their traditions.

Not even in SUMMER.

Not even in AUGUST.

Gosh, that really makes me think of my grandpa (except for the chinotto - he was more into wine).

Gosh, this really makes me think of my beloved grandpa (except for the chinotto – he was more into wine).

This is so true I can actually picture the scene in my mind.

This is so true I can actually picture the scene in my mind.

Italian Language

Aaaand eventually we have reached our area of expertise! I am actually surprise by how many memes there are out there about Italian language – especially related to italian gestures. Needless to say, if you need material to create more memes like this you should sign up **instantly** to one of our Italian Language Courses in Rome!

Mmmm... no.

Mmmm… no (btw you are doing it wrong).

That would be so badass. We strongly encourage you to do it at our school.

That would be so badass. We strongly encourage you to do it at our school.

Probably both.

Probably both.

No, but they sound good!

No, but they sound really good!

Tourism in Italy

These are realy funny, especially for people who are living in Rome or in any other major italian city. Main target is, as you can imagine, the often innocent stupidity that takes over in each and every human being when he\she plays the role of the tourist (especially the english-speaking one).

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And now I dare you to say that government in Italy doesn’t work…

image

Basically puts a vowel at the end-a of-a each-a word-a.

Before seeing this, I used to hate those pics in front of that poor, deformed and abused tower.

Before seeing this, I used to hate those pics in front of that poor, deformed and abused tower.

download

Good point mate!

Italian Economy

Let’s admit it: Italian economy is just a mess. Actually, after the big brexit earthquake, whole Europe is shaking while trying to collect the pieces of EU economy. Perfect subject for memes, isn’t it?

It is NSFW and we are actually very ashamed of fact that his guy has been our prime minister, but still people find it funny...

It is NSFW and we are actually very ashamed of fact that his guy has been our prime minister, but still people find it funny…

Germany for once depicted as the good guy!

Germany for once depicted as the good guy! That is unusual.

Italian sports

Here you’ll get exactly what you expect: lots of football-related memes! We play it dirty, but we can also play it funny.

Summer dance!

Dear Zinedine, we will always be thankful for this.

Dear Zinedine, we will always be thankful for this.

So much Balotelli, so little time...

So much Balotelli, so little time…

Italian Cinema and art

We as Italians gave so much to art history and to the movie industry, that would be simply unfair not to receive anything back, at least in the form of a meme.

Italian Spiderman: not even remotely Italian, but still gorgeous.

Italian Spiderman: not even remotely Italian, but still gorgeous.

A collection of Leonardo's Last Supper parodies, some of which are really clever!

A collection of Leonardo’s Last Supper parodies, some of which are really clever!

If you get this, you deserve an A+ in Italian History.

If you get this, you deserve an A+ in Italian History.

Stereotypes about Italy

If you think about it each and every one of those category contained a fair dose of stereotype which is a common strategy human beings use to understand reality. But sometimes stereotypes become either ridiculous or offensive, and yet a good occasion to build up a successful meme, as you know the internet too is both ridiculous and sometimes deeply offensive.

i-like-italy-because-mario-and-luigi-live-there_o_148490

SUPER-MARIO-IS-ACTUALLY-JAPANESE – like some of your overpaid tattoos.

This is wrong in so many ways...

This is wrong in so many ways…

And that’s all! If you have any suggestion or got angry about something written in this article, feel free to load the comment section with you rants! Alla prossima! 😉

Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.

Italian food haikus

This one is definitely a new one. When the idea was first suggested to me, I laughed my butt off until I realized that my editor was serious. He wanted me to write what? You read the title right folks; these are haikus about Italian food. I apologize to any of my readers who are poetry lovers, because I cannot claim to be even remotely good at poetry. My strength lies in storytelling, not poetry. But with that said, read on at your own risk. Please blame my editor for whatever damage these poems may do to your mind.

Olive taggiasche

olive_taggiascheOlives are a great snack food that I love getting from the fresh market. In Italy they come in these huge barrels and you just fish them out. They are extremely healthy for you. The oil they produce is a staple of Italian cooking, and is present in every Italian kitchen in large quantities. So here is a little poem for our ever-present friend, the olive!

“A great midday snack
Nature’s chewy vitamin
But beware the pit!”

Penne all’arrabbiata

arrabbiataNext up is my personal favorite, penne all’arrabbiata. This dish is akin to the ramen noodles of the Italian culture. Every college student knows how to make it and its relatively simple to make. I personally love this dish, and for those of you who don’t know what it is, its simply tomato sauce but with hot pepper flakes.

“Oh my god, my mouth!
I think I just ate the sun!
Waiter? Please bring more!”

Pizza Margherita

Pizza Margherita

The next is Pizza Margherita. Now this is what I assume the Italian version of chicken nuggets are in America. If you have absolutely no idea what to get, or you are an extremely picky eater, this pizza is always a safe choice. Its pretty hard to screw up and its almost always amazing. This was the only thing I ate when I first came to Italy.

“It makes mouths water,
Eatable display of the flag,
a chefs masterpiece!”

Tiramisù

tiramisu-bimbyThe last poem is about one of the most classic Italian desserts there is: Tiramisù. I love this dish, and though I have yet to perfect it in my own kitchen, I am not about to give up. In this great dish, the Italians have combined coffee, pastry, chocolate, and cream into one great mix of perfection. I applaud whoever came up with this dish.

“A sweet aroma,
And a delicate coffee taste.
Creamy perfection!”

Ok, now you don’t really have to comment the poems themselves, do you? Just post your thoughts on these fantastic dishes in the comment section! 😉

An Expat’s Thoughts On Italy

I have lived in Rome for almost nine months now, and this is a beautiful place with quite a different culture. One of my friends recently asked me what I think of Italy as an expat living in Italy and I couldn’t answer him right away. I decided to write it out considering that this is the best way to express what I am thinking. So I am sharing it here so that everyone can see. What I think is not representative of what all expats think, these are just my observances and opinions. I hope you enjoy!

Attitude

italian2So anyone who knows Italians knows that they have a very unique outlook on life. Living among them for almost nine months, I have to admit that when I first arrived here, this attitude surprised me, but now I almost seem to be adopting it. Their cultural attitude seems to be a juxtaposition between easy going and extremely passionate. They get passionate about the most random things, and you have to be careful not to step on those landmines. I think that I’m scared to because what looks like anger is often just passion. For example, as a student, I have a limited amount of time to come in to work, and so in the first few weeks I would always tell my boss when my work was done, and schedule when I was coming in next week. When I first started working there he told me that I was always welcome. And so after a few times of me trying to schedule when to come in next he abruptly cut me off and said “Andrea, you are ALWAYS welcome. To keep trying to schedule is insulting in my culture because I have already told you the door is already open whenever, to keep checking that its still open is an insult to my hospitality.” I had no idea that I was insulting him, and maybe this was just an example of me not knowing certain cultural differences, but I have never seen anyone that passionate about being hospitable.

1455024216This is a culture of very warm and friendly people, and they are the first to jump into a car and rescue you if you are stranded somewhere. Honestly the friends I have made in Rome are some of the sweetest and most caring people. And for some reason they are always trying to get me to eat something, or checking to see if I’ve eaten a meal recently. Its endearing. But that is only after they know you. Now, these people are quite easy to get to know, but before they do, they are quite similar to cats, and all the expats I’ve met seem to agree with me. If you walk past them on the street, they wont move for you, and will bump into you without a second thought, which is kind of irritating when you aren’t a very big person. Also, they don’t hesitate to get right into your personal space, which may be just be a cultural thing. Americans like a bigger bubble of personal space then Italians I guess. My mother told me once when she was shopping in the super market, she was in the freezer section looking down at some frozen peas or something, when all of a sudden a lady got right up next to her. Like shoulder to shoulder close. Maybe because my mom is American, but she got extremely uncomfortable.  (And some of you might be thinking, oh she needs to be more careful, that woman might have been a pickpocket, but be calm my birdies, she had her hand on her purse through out this strange encounter.) Honestly if I had the time, I’d be here talking about this part of their culture till next Tuesday, but since you probably don’t have that kind of time to kill, lets just move on to the next category.

Dress

xkadriaroma859Ok this one is a stranger one. So I’m going to start off by saying that I am by noooo means into fashion, or even very good at putting together cute outfits. I grew up dressing in whatever t-shirt and jeans I grabbed first, and I lived in a place where fashion wasn’t the biggest thing that I had to worry about. So moving here and realizing that everyone takes what he or she wears extremely seriously definitely made me feel like a fish out of water. I do have to thank them for making me a bit more aware of the clothes I wear, however, I don’t know if I will ever make it as high of a priority. Also, they rarely wear shorts. The picture to the right is very unusual to see. It will be at least 90 degrees out and there is still a crap ton of people wearing pants.
Another thing is that they seem to try and copy American street fashion, and yet Americans try to copy Italian fashion? I will forever be confused by this exchange. I can’t really talk about fashion for a lengthy period because its just not something I pay much attention to. However, I will tell you that I have met very few Italians who will go outside without making sure they look absolutely perfect. Their hat has to match their shirt or shoes, yada yada yada.

Culture

8396842_origThis is a bit different than an actual attitude toward life in general, the things I’m going to talk about are just general differences I noticed from both cultures. One nice thing about Italian culture is that they don’t shut away their older population. I like seeing a meet-up of a bunch of elderly people who are just chatting away, gossiping- about someone’s grandchild or making witty remarks about another’s spouse. I don’t eavesdrop for very long because my mama taught me better, however its always nice to see a big group of them sitting in some piazza, drinking coffee and chuckling together. You don’t see that in America, or at least where I am from. In America there are retirement homes, and retirement communities, where the elderly live and rarely leave. Of course there are many who do not conform to this general stereotype of the American elderly, such as those who stay in the north for the summer and go to the south for winter. I believe they call them “snowbirds”. However, growing up, if you asked a peer “oh where do your grandparents live?” at least ninety percent of them would respond with “so and so retirement homes/communities.” In America, the elderly are more shut away and thought of as a thing to protect and care for.

IMG_3456Another great thing that I love about the Italian culture is that they make fresh food a priority. There is always a place to buy fresh vegetables and fruit on every street, and they are soo cheap! The food you can make here tastes so much better because the ingredients are so fresh. They pick them in the morning and you get them a few hours later. On my way to class I can stop by this little shop that is so filled with vegetables and fruits that there is only a very narrow pathway down the middle and you have to flatten yourself against the wall of fragrant apples if anyone needs to get past you. I stop there and buy a few apples to snack on during the day and they cost me no more then fifty cents all together. While this isn’t to say that they don’t have frozen food, they definitely don’t use it as much as Americans do.
Ok but I have to say that I really miss dryers. If America is doing anything right it’s having dryers. And I know that America and Italy are very different in terms of culture and that Italian are very conscious of the amount of energy they use, but oh my god, what I wouldn’t give to not have to think about how long its going to take my jeans to dry and play out what day to do laundry according to that. All of my Italian friends laugh and say that I’m spoiled, but whatever. I really miss having a dryer.

Food

AA2027Okay, I mentioned food a littler earlier, but here I am going to dedicate an entire section. Let me start off by saying “Oh LORDIE yes. Italian food is just a yes, all around.” They have perfected pasta and pizza and while I don’t exactly like fish, I am told by many people that they really know how to prepare it. Italians are some of the best cooks in the world, and through all of the downsides of moving to Rome, I have to say that the food makes all of those cons sting just a little less. Of course I occasionally miss Chipotle or Americanized-Chinese food, but you know I can’t exactly complain. My favorite dish is definitely pasta with arrabbiata (means angry, because it’s spicy!) sauce. My only warning to everyone out there is don’t eat pasta all the time. No one told me this when I first got here and I’ve been trying to loose the extra pounds ever since. While pasta and pizza are what Italy is mainly known for, they actually have very healthy choices and their style of cooking with olive oil instead of butter may seem small, but a great change to one’s diet.

Well folks, if you agree or disagree with what I wrote please feel free to comment below, but remember to be kind! I hope all of you have a lovely day, ciao!

Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.

5 annoying types of people you will (almost) always find at an Italian Aperitif

Italy is the worldwide known homeland of Aperitivo, although this cultural institution substiantially changes if you scroll  from southern to northern Italy.

Now, if you’re in love with Italy and Italian Lifestyle you might have attended to more than one aperitif in your life, even in Italy. And surely you have been able to identify these 5 particular kinds of attendees which are infesting every aperitif or happy hour in the world:

  1. 48802873Mr. Know-It-All – Are you talking about your late holiday in that far away island located in the middle of the Pacific? He probably had been there before you even knew of its existance. Are your friends discussing about a very obscure czech novelist that they have just discovered? He spent the past five years writing essays about his works. In few words, there’s no subject in which this charmless mr. Know-It-All cannot put his long nose. And believe me when I say that alcohol can only make thing worse, giving the guy an amount of self-confidence which is frankly unmanageable by a regular human being. Anyway, as our saint patron Morrissey used to say, “there’s gonna be someone somewhere, with a big(ger) nose who knows, and shuts you up and laughs when you fall”. Just wait and see.
  2. 57242257The Wine Expert – Italian aperitif is a magnificent occasion to taste good wine and wine-based drinks such as the spritz, but this wonderful opportunity has its scary downside: it attracts hordes of self-proclaimed wine experts which will make your head explode with neverending descriptions of the wine they (or you) are tasting. Letting alone the fact that adjectives such as “laser-like” or “intellectually satisfying” should be banished from any conversation, the truth is that if you blindfold the poor Wine Expert you will find out he’s not able to recognize a carton of Tavernello from a bottle of Amarone.
  3. futurama-fry-meme-generator-not-sure-if-tipsy-or-just-drunk-d0043aThe Always Tipsy – Hold on: aperitif is not for getting drunk. It is a social occasion, a mean to converse and take a pleasant break after a working day or before a long night. This is why the Always Tipsy type looks particulary ridiculous in this specific context. He\she gets to the bar usually suited up after having worked behind a desk for the whole day, and right after the first sip of prosecco is already giggling like a teenager. This type of person usually starts to lose his\her dignity (i.e. loosened tie, heeled shoes off etc.) at the end of the first drink and becomes actually unbearable at the second one, which usually coincides with a collective “sorry, I need to go home, tomorrow I have to work” pronounced in unison by his mates, leaving the poor guy alone with his (fake) hangover.
  4. The Gourmet Guy – Every respectable aperitif offers a good selection of food to99a2c39d89c66b56c651057cfffab1628311b763f002331681b59933b15d47f7 accompany your drink. But bear in mind that the meal you will get during an aperitif in Italy won’t always be as good as you might expect. Italians tend to be aware of this, and although we are traditionally picky about our food, we usually turn a blind eye on the lack of quality of some buffets. This is not always the case though, especially if you live the unpleasant experience of meeting the infamous Gourmet Guy: constantly bitching about the texture of his tartine, the freshness of his caponatina or the real origin of his olive taggiasche, this type is a real nightmare. If you want to enjoy your not-so-wonderful meal without feeling like you’re eating at the soup kitchen, just stay away.
  5. whenever-i-get-called-anti-social-for-being-quiet-28192The Silent One – As we said, aperitif is a mean to socialize. Nevertheless, you will always find a guy who joins your group and doesn’t utter a word for the entire evening. Is he too tired to have a chat? Doesn’t he like your company? Is he dumb? Nobody knows. The only thing you know is the embarassing feeling of sharing your table with the cardboard cutout of a person.

Not in the mood of joining an aperitif after reading this? Well, not all aperitifs are the same. For instance, you can join our Linguistic Aperitif, every Tuesday in Trastevere and every first Thursday of the month in Monti, and meet new, international friends while practicing your Italian. And if you’re not in Rome just don’t panic: there’s still the chance to have a radio-aperitif offered by our Italian Language School. Just invite your friends, play one of our podcasts and practice some Italian with us: this will surely save you from the embarassing silence of a struggling conversation…

Read the original article on Kappa Language School’s website.